Postgraduate Students and their Research interests


Carving the Exotic: Conflict, Tourism and Confinement in Bermuda

Deborah A. Atwood, B.A., M.A. [Completed 2015]

Deborah Atwood - image 1aa

My principal research interests lie in the fields of conflict, confinement and cultural heritage tourism and their impact on the Bermudian landscape. I am investigating the role that conflict and confinement play in the development of social relationships and cultural identity in 19th - and 20th century Bermuda. Focusing on the confinement art and landscapes created and experienced by convicts and prisoners-of-war incarcerated in Bermuda, I examine how these objects and landscapes fit into Bermudian constructions of materiality and identity and the development of Bermuda’s tourism trade.

Email: debatwood@gmail.com

 Top


Conflict Landscapes of the Chaco War

Esther Breithoff, B.A., M.A.

Esther Breithoff - image 1bb

I am researching the Chaco War (1932-1935) between Bolivia and Paraguay. I am particularly interested in the destruction of an indigenous landscape by industrial war, and the new landscapes, material culture, and social relationships that were created by the effects of this armed conflict and its aftermath. I have recently been awarded a Santander Travel Grant for research into business and economic-related themes associated with my work.

Email: esther.breithoff@hotmail.co.uk

Top


The Body as Material Culture in Recent Conflicts

Susannah Callow B.A., M.A. [Completed 2014]

human skeleton 

My research focuses on human bodies as material culture within twentieth and twenty-first century conflicts. This includes the creation of souvenirs and trophies from body parts, post-mortem mutilation, and wider conceptual issues concerning the conflict body as material culture. I am particularly interested in revealing how definitions of humanity, and the significance of the body, are shaped by the specific pressures of modern industrialised conflict, and how they are represented.

Top


The Materialities of Communist Defence: Socialist and Post-Socialist Landscapes of Southern Albania

Emily Glass, B.S.c., M.A. 

an image of Emily Glasscc

Albania was materially and philosophically appropriated by a paranoid dictatorship which left the Communist landscape littered with a defence infrastructure which has been subjected to a diversity of official and unofficial uses. My research focuses on the reuse and reinterpretation of these tangible elements of Socialism, and on the creation of an analytical framework established through fieldwork, mapping data, oral histories, and the study of archive documents.

Email: emilyglass@yahoo.com

Top


 

An Archaeological and Anthropological Exploration of the Subterranean Worlds of The Western Front During the First World War

Matthew Leonard B.A., M.A. 

an image of Matthew LeonardMatthew Leonard - image 2

 

Adopting an interdisciplinary and holistic approach, my research aims to throw new light onto the human experience of subterranean landscapes of the Western Front during the First World War. I focus on how trenches, dugouts, forts, and cave systems in northern France and Belgium were created, elaborated, and experienced through a reconfigured sensorial engagement of man and landscape created by industrial war.

 Email: mgpleonard@aol.com

Top


Conflict archaeology in Wadi Yutm, southern Jordan

John M. Scott [Completed 2015]

an image of John M. Scottgg

 

My research aims to expand the understanding of modern conflict through the investigation of the archaeological remains in Wadi Yutm, southern Jordan. The region is very well suited to the study of conflict due to the presence of prehistoric, historical, and modern sites defensively positioned, and associated with military occupation and control.

Email: jmsxx@aol.com

Top


Wood within warfare: The physical and emotional constraints

Chantel Summerfield, B.A., M.A.

hhii

 

My AHRC-funded research investigates the relationship between people, nature, and warfare in the landscapes of industrialised conflict. I focus on items of material culture made from wood during twentieth-century war, including the creation and use of military carvings (‘arborglyphs’) in Europe and the UK, as mediums of self-expression, identity, and longing. I am particularly interested in the activities of the Canadian Forestry Corps during the twentieth century.

Email: chantel_summerfield@hotmail.com

Top


The Conflict Landscapes of southern Jordan

John B Winterburn, BSc., M.A., C. Eng. 

jjkk

 

The landscapes of southern Jordan offer a unique insight into the contested spaces of a desert landscape during the First World War. Britain and the Ottoman Empire engaged in conflict through railways, aeroplanes, and motorised vehicles at the same time as a traditional camel-borne Arab army conducted the first major guerrilla campaign of the 20th century. My research focuses on the multivalent and multi-layered landscapes that were created and experienced during these momentous events, and their enduring and contested legacies.

Email: John.Winterburn@Bristol.ac.uk

Top


Experiencing World War One Aviation: an anthropological archaeological perspective, 1914-2016  

Melanie Winterton, B.A., M.A.

Mel fliesll

My AHRC-funded research focuses on a cultural study of pilot's experiences of being on the Western Front, whether on the ground, inside the plane, or flying during training, combat, or reconnaissance. Modern conflict archaeology and contemporary archaeology more widely need to consider ‘airspace’ as a distinct realm; consequently, I am particularly interested in the pilot body’s sensory experiences of airscapes, and the need to bring to life tangible aviation-related material culture. I also address heritage issues, particularly in terms of how we remember and experience First World War aviation.

Email: Melanie.Winterton@bristol.ac.uk

Top


The Goldsmith's Workshop: a study of mining and metallurgy in Colombia during the contact period

Jimena Lobo Guerrero Arenas, B.A., M.A.

Esther Breithoff - image 1dd 

 

 In Colombia, South America, there was a large and sophisticated tradition of metalworking during pre-Hispanic times. By contrast, after the sixteenth-century Spanish conquest, little is known concerning the changes and transformations of this defining cultural tradition. My University of Bristol-funded research focuses on the study of metallurgy and mining work during the contact period: it includes the study of individual craftsmen and workshops, the reconstruction of the technology and organization of metal production, and the definition and meaning of the roles played by metal items in the reconfigured cultural milieu of that time. I am undertaking archaeological fieldwork and archival research, and am particularly concerned with investigating the processes of change-and-permanence that took place during this period.

Top